How does Safecode Defencecure use disk space?

Unlike conventional backup and restore software, Safecode Defencecure protects PC systems and data without creating duplicate copies. It’s a pioneering concept, but it’s often confusing for many users accustomed to conventional backup/restore products. The following questions and answers explain the fundamental concept of how Safecode Defencecure uses disk space.

How much disk space do I need to set up Safecode Defencecure?

Safecode Defencecure protects PC systems and data in real-time without creating duplicate copies. It doesn’t take or reserve a lot of disk space to set up. The setup only takes about 0.1% of hard disk space to create the installation snapshot and the snapshot database.

For example:

1. You have a  PC with a 100GB hard drive with 50GB of data and 50GB of free space.

2. Safecode Defencecure setup would take about 100MB disk space (100000MB*0.1%=100MB).

3. After setup Safecode Defencecure, you would have about 49.90GB free space.

How much disk space do I need to take a new snapshot?

Safecode Defencecure does not take any disk space for taking a snapshot. The space taken by a new snapshot, the snapshot size shown on the snapshot properties, is the amount of data that’s been added (changed) since the last snapshot.

For example:

1. You have a  PC with a 100GB hard drive with 50GB of data and 50GB of free space.
2. You install Safecode Defencecure on the PC. The setup creates the Installation snapshot. You have about 50GB of free space (see the example above).

3. You then install Microsoft Office 2010, which takes 1GB. You now have 49B free space.

3. You take a new snapshot called Office2010. After creating the snapshot Office2010, the free space is still 49GB. (Note Safecode Defencecure didn’t take any additional disk space for creating snapshot Office2010. The size of the snapshot Office2010 is 1GB, used by Microsoft Office 2010 files.)

How can I delete files and free disk space from snapshots?

To free disk space from deleting files, you must meet one condition: THE FILES DELETED ARE NOT IN ANY OTHER SNAPSHOTS. The general rule of thumb is: If a file is nowhere to be found in any snapshots – it shouldn’t exist on the hard disk, then it shouldn’t take up any disk space. But if the file is found in any snapshot – it is on the hard disk, then it takes up disk space.

For example

1. You have a  PC with a 100GB hard drive with 50GB of data and 50GB of free space.
2. You install Safecode Defencecure on the PC. The setup creates the Installation snapshot. You have about 50GB of free space after setup(see the example above).

3. You then install Microsoft Office 2010, which takes 1GB. You now have 49GB of free space.

4. You take a new snapshot called Office2010. You still have 49GB of free space.

5. You uninstall Office 2010 and remove all its files. But the free space still shows 49GB because the MS office files are locked in the Snapshot Office2010. If you roll back the PC to the snapshot Office2010, the Office 2010 will be there; therefore, office 2010 files are still on the hard drive and taking up disk space.

6. You then take a snapshot called No-office. The space taken by this snapshot is almost nothing because no data has been added since the Snapshot Office2010. You have 49GB of free space.

7. You delete the snapshot Office2010. At this point, we only have the Installation snapshot, which does not have MS Office 2010, and the No-office snapshot, which does not have Office 2010 either. So the 1GB space used by Office 2010 should be recycled.

8. Run Snapshot Defragmenter in Safecode Defencecure. The free space should be 50GB.

I deleted a snapshot and run Snapshot Defragmenter, but the free space remains unchanged. What’s wrong?

It’s because the snapshot you just deleted has children snapshots that inherited the data.

For example

1. You have a  PC with a 100GB hard drive with 50GB of data and 50GB of free space.
2. You install Safecode Defencecure on the PC. The setup creates the Installation snapshot. You have about 50GB of free space after setup (see the example above).

3. You then install Microsoft Office 2010, which takes up 1GB disk space. You now have 49GB of free space.

4. You take a new snapshot called Office2010. You still have 49GB of free space.

5. You then take a new snapshot called Office2010-Child (the Office2010-Child snapshot is a child snapshot of Office2010). There is no data added to the PC since the snapshot Office2010, so the size of the Office2010-Child is almost nothing. You still have 49GB of free space.

6. You delete the snapshot Office2010 and run Snapshot Defragmenter, but the free space is still at 49GB. No free space was gained from deleting the snapshot. This is because the snapshot Office2010-Child, as the child snapshot of the Office-snapshot, has Office 2010 files. The space taken by Office 2010 cannot be freed (remember the rule of thumb!).

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